¡Sólo se vive una vez! (you only live once): a pilot evaluation of individually tailored video modules aiming to increase HIV testing among foreign-born Latino men

Post Date: 
2017-02-01
Publication: 
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Summary: 
BACKGROUND:
Although Latinos living in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV, the development, implementation, and evaluation of HIV prevention, testing, and linkage to care interventions lag behind efforts occurring in other communities. To address sociocultural barriers to testing, we developed a multilevel intervention. This study is a pilot evaluation of the individual-level component of the intervention-animated video modules that address specific barriers to HIV testing common among foreign-born Latino men.
 
METHODS:
We conducted a survey assessing HIV risk and barriers to testing with a convenience sample of 104 foreign-born Latino men in Baltimore, MD, who had not tested for HIV within the past year. Intention to test in the next 3 months was measured before and after viewing an intervention module selected based on survey responses.
 
RESULTS:
Fifty-two (50.0%) participants had never tested for HIV. Of the participants who had previously tested for HIV, the mean time since their last test was 3.48 years (SD = 3.55). Participants' intention to test for HIV significantly increased after watching the module (t = -8.28, P < 0.001). Increased intention to test was not associated with any socio-demographic characteristics (ie, age, country of origin) or reported sexual behaviors (ie, number of sex partners in the past year).
 
DISCUSSION:
These results suggest that our culturally sensitive, individually tailored intervention can be an additional tool to encourage HIV testing among previously untested foreign-born Latino men, one of the demographic groups at highest risk for delayed HIV diagnosis in the United States.
Citation: 
Dolwick Grieb SM1, Flores-Miller A, Page KR. ¡Sólo se vive una vez! (you only live once): a pilot evaluation of individually tailored video modules aiming to increase HIV testing among foreign-born Latino men. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2017 Feb 1;74 Suppl 2:S104-S112. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001239. PMID: 28079720 PMCID: PMC5234818
Collaborators: 
  • Center for Child and Community Health Research, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Baltimore City Health Department Bureau of HIV/STD Services, Baltimore, MD