Effectiveness of peer support on care engagement and preventive care intervention utilization among pre-antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected adults in Rakai, Uganda: a randomized trial

Post Date: 
2015-08-14
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Countries: 
Publication: 
AIDS and Behavior
Summary: 
442 pre-ART, HIV-infected adults were randomized to peer support consisting of structured home visits to promote clinic attendance and preventive care intervention use or standard of care. At baseline, 62 % reported previously visiting an HIV clinic, 45 % reported taking cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and 31 % were "care-naïve" (no previous clinic visit and not on cotrimoxazole). After 1 year, intervention participants were more likely to report being in care (92 vs 84 %; PRR 1.09, p = 0.039), on cotrimoxazole (89 vs 81 %; PRR 1.10, p = 0.047), and safe water vessel adherence (23 vs 14 %; PRR 1.64, p = 0.024). The effect was observed only among care-naïve participants (n = 139) with 83 % intervention versus 56 % controls reporting being in HIV care (PRR 1.47, p = 0.006), 78 versus 58 % on cotrimoxazole (PRR 1.35, p = 0.04), and 20 versus 4 % safe water vessel adherence (PRR 5.78, p = 0.017). Peer support may be an effective intervention to facilitate pre-ART care compliance in this important population.
Citation: 
Chang LW, Kakigozi, G, Billioux VG, Gray RH, Serwadda D, Quinn TC, Wawer MJ, Bollinger RC, Reynolds SJ. Effectiveness of peer support on care engagement and preventive care intervention utilization among pre-antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected adults in Rakai, Uganda: a randomized trial. AIDS and Behavior. 2015 14 Aug. doi:10.1007/s10461-015-1159-y
Collaborators: 
  • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • Rakai Health Sciences Program, Rakai, Uganda.
  • NIH/NIAID, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, Bethesda, MD