Maternal tuberculosis: a risk factor for mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus

Post Date: 
2011-02-01
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Publication: 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Summary: 

Background: Maternal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA load, CD4 cell count, breast-feeding, antiretroviral use, and malaria are well-established factors associated with mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV; the role of maternal tuberculosis (TB), however, has not been well established.


 


Methods: The study population was 783 HIV-infected Indian mother-infant pair participants in randomized and ancillary HIV-infected cohorts of the Six Week Extended-Dose Nevirapine (SWEN) Study, a study comparing extended nevirapine versus single-dose nevirapine, to reduce MTCT of HIV among breast-fed infants. Using multivariable logistic regression, we assessed the impact of maternal TB occurring during pregnancy and through 12 months after delivery on risk of MTCT.

Citation: 
Gupta A, Bhosale R, Kinikar A, Gupte N, Bharadwaj R, Kagal A, Joshi S, Khandekar M, Karmarkar A, Kulkarni V, Sastry J, Mave V, Suryavanshi N, Thakar M, Kulkarni S, Tripathy S, Sambarey P, Patil S, Paranjape R, Bollinger RC and Jamkar A, for the SWEN India Study Team. Maternal tuberculosis: a risk factor for mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. J Infect Dis. 2011 February 1:203; 358-363. PMCID:PMC3071111
Collaborators: 


  • Byramji Jeejeebhoy Medical College, Pune, India

  • National AIDS Research Institute, Pune, India