Pooled individual data analysis of five randomized trials of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission

Post Date: 
2012-10-19
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Clinical Sites: 
Publication: 
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Summary: 
Background:
In resource-limited settings, mothers infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) face a difficult choice: breastfeed their infants but risk transmitting HIV-1 or not breastfeed their infants and risk the infants dying of other infectious diseases or malnutrition. Recent results from observational studies and randomized clinical trials indicate daily administration of nevirapine to the infant can prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission.
 
Methods:
Data from 5396 mother-infant pairs who participated in 5 randomized trials where the infant was HIV-1 negative at birth were pooled to estimate the efficacy of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission. Four daily regimens were compared: nevirapine for 6 weeks, 14 weeks, or 28 weeks, or nevirapine plus zidovudine for 14 weeks.
Citation: 
Hudgens M, Taha T, Omer S, Jamieson D, Lee H, Mofenson L, Chasela C, Kourtis A, Kumwenda N, Ruff, A, Bedri A, Jackson J, Musoke P, Bollinger RC, Gupte, N, Thigpen M, Taylor A, van der Horst C. Pooled individual data analysis of five randomized trials of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission. Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Oct 19. PMCID:PMC3518881
Collaborators: 
  • University of North Carolina at, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Emory University, Atlanta, GA
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD
  • University of North Carolina Project, Lilongwe, Malawi
  • Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia
  • Makerere University–Johns Hopkins University Research Collaboration
  • Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda