Feasibility and acceptability of smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment of alcohol use among African American men who have sex with men in Baltimore

Post Date: 
2015-06-17
Publication: 
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Summary: 
Background: Alcohol use is a risk factor for the acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among African American men who havesex with men (MSM). Mobile phone-based ecological momentary assessments (EMA) could minimize bias due to retrospective recall and thus provide a better understanding of the social and structural context of alcohol use and its relationship with HIV-related risk behaviors in this population as well as other highly stigmatized populations.
 
Objective: We describe the study design and the implementation, feasibility, reactivity, and acceptability of an EMA study of alcohol use and HIV-related behaviors among African American MSM in Baltimore.
 
Methods: Participants were recruited through flyers and word-of-mouth in Baltimore from September 2013 to November 2014. Each participant was loaned an Android smartphone and instructed to respond to multiple prompts from the mobile app for 4 weeks. Data were collected through (1) random prompts delivered three times daily assessing participants' location, activity, mood, and social context, (2) daily prompts capturing drinking and sex events occurring in the past 24 hours, and (3) event-contingent responses collecting participants' self-reported episodes of drinking.
Citation: 
Yang C, Linas B, Kirk G, Bollinger R, Chang L, Chander G, Siconolfi D, Braxton S, Rudolph A, Latkin C. Feasibility and acceptability of smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment of alcohol use among African American men who have sex with men in Baltimore. JMIR mHealth uHealth. 2015 Apr-Jun;3(2):e67. doi: 10.2196/mhealth.4344.
Collaborators: 
  • Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Baltimore, MD
  • Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, MD
  • Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Beltsville, MD